Dentist Blog

Posts for tag: dental implants

Dental implants have been around for more than three decades. Each year, more and more dentists, such as Dr. Robert Wyler, your dental expert in Waukesha, WI, place implants as superior tooth replacements for patients missing any number of teeth. If you have unhealthy and unattractive smile gaps, implants could be for you!

What is a dental implant?

It's like nothing you've seen before, especially if you're accustomed to traditional prosthetics such as partial dentures, full dentures, and fixed bridgework. In contrast with implants, traditional tooth replacements cannot improve gum tissue or jaw bone density, and they typically cause some wear and tear on adjoining teeth which help to support them.

Conversely, the single-tooth implant composed of a titanium screw, metal alloy abutment and authentic porcelain crown, does everything conventional tooth replacements cannot. Because your dentist inserts the implant screw into your jaw bone, the artificial tooth gives you excellent anchorage and improved gum and bone density. This is due to how the bone literally fuses to the implant through osseointegration. No other prosthetic features this amazing natural process, and it's the reason why dental implants in Waukesha are so successful.

Are you a good candidate?

To find this out, Dr. Wyler will examine your mouth and take digital X-rays. If he determines that you are healthy and your jaw bone is dense and strong, the treatment can happen in just a few visits. Both dentist and patient must allow sufficient time between implant placement and restoration with the abutment and crown. Given this necessity, appointments are typically spaced several weeks apart so that the implant sites can heal completely and withstand the pressures of biting and chewing.

Additionally, good candidates brush and floss daily. Ideally, patients should also be non-smokers as tobacco degrades implant sites which can cause an infection called peri-implantitis. It resembles periodontitis and may ruin implant sites and necessitate removal of the devices.

Even if you are missing several teeth, you likely can receive implants. Again, jaw bone density is key, as is the condition of your remaining teeth!

Look forward to a new smile

Dental implants are a wonderful alternative to the awkward partials and dentures you keep in a cup on your bedside table. If you are motivated and patient, dental implants could be for you! Find out more during a consultation with Dr. Robert Wyler. Call his Waukesha office today to arrange your examination: (262) 784-5757.

IncreaseBoneMassforDentalImplantsthroughGrafting

Losing a tooth from disease or accident can be traumatic. The good news, though, is that it can be replaced with a life-like replica that restores your smile. One of the most popular and durable solutions is a dental implant, which replaces not only the root of the tooth but the crown as well.

But there's a possible wrinkle with implants — for accurate placement there must be a sufficient amount of bone around it. This could be a problem if you've been missing the tooth for sometime: without the stimulus provided by a tooth as you chew, older bone cells aren't replaced at an adequate rate. The bone volume gradually diminishes, as up to 25% of its normal width can be lost during the first year after tooth loss. A traumatic injury can damage underlying bone to an even greater extent.

There is a possible solution, but it will require the services of other specialists, particularly a periodontist trained in gum and bone structure. The first step is a complete examination of the mouth to gauge the true extent of any bone loss. While x-rays play a crucial role, a CT scan in particular provides a three-dimensional view of the jaw and more detail on any bone loss.

With a more accurate bone loss picture, we can then set about actually creating new bone through grafting procedures. One such technique is called a ridge augmentation: after opening the gum tissues, we place the bone graft within a barrier membrane to protect it. Over time the bone will grow replacing both the grafting material and membrane structure.

Once we have enough regenerated bone, we can then perform dental implant surgery. There are two options: a “one-stage” procedure in which a temporary crown is placed on the implant immediately after surgery; or a “two-stage” in which we place the gum tissue over the implant to protect it as it heals and bone grows and attaches to it. In cases of pre-surgical bone grafting, it's usually best to go with the two-stage procedure for maximum protection while the bone strengthens around it.

Necessary preparation of the bone for a future dental implant takes time. But the extra effort will pay off with a new smile you'll be proud to display.

If you would like more information on special situations with dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Robert L. Wyler DDS, SC
July 26, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures

Living with missing teeth can have a profound impact not just on your oral health, but on your overall quality of life as well. Studies have dental implantsshown that damaged and missing teeth are one of the leading causes of embarrassment and low self-esteem for many American adults, and it is easy to understand why. A damaged smile can ruin a first impression, and affect everything from getting a new job or a raise and promotion, to fully engaging and participating in a healthy and active social life. But there are a number of solutions available to help restore missing teeth and your oral health. Dr. Robert Wyler, a dentist in Waukesha, WI, recommends dental implants for healthy adults living with full or partial tooth loss.

Fix Your Smile with Dental Implants in Waukesha, WI

Dental implants consist of two parts: the implant, which is surgically placed in the socket of the missing tooth in place of the root, and the cosmetic crown which is attached to the implant with an abutment. The implant is made of a small titanium screw, which is biocompatible and fuses with the surrounding bone tissue in the gums to secure the implant in place and preserve bone density in the gums.

Bone loss is a prominent factor in gum (periodontal) disease, and because bone tissue begins to erode as soon as you lose a tooth, dental implants are an important tool against oral health issues as well as cosmetic improvements to your overall smile. Implants can replace a single missing tooth, or secure an entire set of dentures (known as implant supported overdentures).

In order to qualify for implants, adults must be in good general health, have enough bone density to support an implant, and commit to ongoing oral health and regular follow up dental care. With proper care, implants have a very high success rate and offer a great long-term cosmetic and oral health solution to tooth loss.

Find a Dentist in Waukesha, WI

For more information about dental implants and other cosmetic and restorative dentistry options, contact our office by calling (262) 784-5757 to schedule an appointment with Dr. Wyler today.

JohnnysTeethArentRottenAnyMore

Everyone has to face the music at some time — even John Lydon, former lead singer of The Sex Pistols, arguably England’s best known punk rock band. The 59-year old musician was once better known by his stage name, Johnny Rotten — a brash reference to the visibly degraded state of his teeth. But in the decades since his band broke up, Lydon’s lifelong deficiency in dental hygiene had begun to cause him serious problems.

In recent years, Lydon has had several dental surgeries — including one to resolve two serious abscesses in his mouth, which left him with stitches in his gums and a temporary speech impediment. Photos show that he also had missing teeth, which, sources say, he opted to replace with dental implants.

For Lydon (and many others in the same situation) that’s likely to be an excellent choice. Dental implants are the gold standard for tooth replacement today, for some very good reasons. The most natural-looking of all tooth replacements, implants also have a higher success rate than any other method: over 95 percent. They can be used to replace one tooth, several teeth, or an entire arch (top or bottom row) of teeth. And with only routine care, they can last for the rest of your life.

Like natural teeth, dental implants get support from the bone in your jaw. The implant itself — a screw-like titanium post — is inserted into the jaw in a minor surgical operation. The lifelike, visible part of the tooth — the crown — is attached to the implant by a sturdy connector called an abutment. In time, the titanium metal of the implant actually becomes fused with the living bone tissue. This not only provides a solid anchorage for the prosthetic, but it also prevents bone loss at the site of the missing tooth — which is something neither bridgework nor dentures can do.

It’s true that implants may have a higher initial cost than other tooth replacement methods; in the long run, however, they may prove more economical. Over time, the cost of repeated dental treatments and periodic replacement of shorter-lived tooth restorations (not to mention lost time and discomfort) can easily exceed the expense of implants.

That’s a lesson John Lydon has learned. “A lot of ill health came from neglecting my teeth,” he told a newspaper reporter. “I felt sick all the time, and I decided to do something about it… I’ve had all kinds of abscesses, jaw surgery. It costs money and is very painful. So Johnny says: ‘Get your brush!’”

We couldn’t agree more. But if brushing isn’t enough, it may be time to consider dental implants. If you would like more information about dental implants, please call our office to schedule a consultation. You can read more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Dental Implants” and “Save a Tooth or Get an Implant?

GoodOralHygieneJustasImportantforImplantsasforNaturalTeeth

Dental implants are known for their durability as well as life-like beauty. Thanks to their unique construction and ability to integrate with bone, they have a very high success rate and can last for decades.

But while they’re less problematic than other restorations, we still can’t “set them and forget them.” While the implants themselves aren’t susceptible to disease, the supporting gums, bone and adjacent teeth are. If you want them to last as long as possible, you’ll need to care for them and the rest of your mouth through daily oral hygiene and semi-annual office cleanings.

With that said, there are a few differences in how we perform hygiene tasks with implants. This is due to the way in which they attach to the jaw, as the titanium post is inserted directly into the bone. Natural teeth, on the other hand, are held in place by the periodontal ligament, a strong connective tissue that lies between the teeth and bone. The ligament holds the teeth firmly in place while also allowing minute tooth movement in response to changes in the mouth.

The ligament also has an ample blood supply that assists with fighting infection that may arise in the tooth and its supporting gums. Without this extra source of defense, infections that arise around an implant can grow quickly into a condition known as peri-implantitis and lead to rapid bone loss that could cause the implant to fail.

That’s why you and your hygienist must be ever vigilant to the buildup of plaque, the bacterial film that gives rise to dental disease, around implants and adjacent teeth. This includes removing plaque buildup from implant surfaces, although your hygienist will use tools (scalers or curettes) made of plastic or resin rather than traditional metal to avoid scratching the implant’s dental material. They’ll likewise use nylon or plastic tips with ultrasonic equipment (which uses high vibration to loosen plaque) and lower power settings with water irrigation devices.

Keeping infection at bay with effective hygiene is the number one maintenance goal with dental implants. Doing your part along with your hygienist will help you get the most of this investment in your smile.

If you would like more information on oral hygiene with dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Maintenance.”